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LA Design Center


LA Design Center

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LA Design Center


LA Design Center

 

LA DESIGN CENTER
Los Angeles, CA | 2004

Part of a four-phase master plan, this project involved the transformation of two derelict warehouses in South Los Angeles (formerly called South Central) into the first phase of a new showroom district whose purpose is to serve the area’s many furniture manufacturers. The project also includes venues for cultural events. It contributes to the economic renewal of this historically overlooked neighborhood with 20,000 square feet of exterior event space and 80,000 square feet of flexible interior space.

Off-the-shelf materials such as concrete, polycarbonate, cement board, fabric, ordinary lumber, as well as small amounts of stainless steel and zinc sheet metal, were selected for their low cost, ease of construction, industrial nature, and inherent beauty. The building’s interiors were sandblasted to bring back the warmth of the existing wood and masonry structures.

The main exterior space between the two buildings serves as the social center of the project and can be used as an ordinary parking lot, a combination “people-car” space (its most common function), or a large event space. Several events, including the 2005 Los Angeles Chapter AIA Gala, have encouraged many Angelenos to visit a neighborhood they have never been to before.

 
 
 

Project Team

Principal-in-Charge: John Friedman
Project Team: Alice Kimm, Dan Brunn
Structural Engineers: Mackintosh & Mackintosh (building); Franceschi Engineering, Inc. (gates); William Koh and Associates, Inc. (monument sign)
Electrical Engineer: Pacific Engineers Group
Landscape Architect: Orange Street Studio
Graphic Design: Garza Group Communications, Inc.
General Contractor: Brunswick Builders
Photography: Fotoworks

 

Client

Francisco and Alba Pinedo, Cisco Brothers

Awards

2007 The Bruner Foundation
Rudy Bruner Silver Medal for Urban Excellence

2006 AIA/Los Angeles
Decade Award

2005 AIA California Council
Merit Award

2004 AIA National
Institute Honor Award

2004 The Chicago Athenaeum
American Architecture Award

2004 AIA/Los Angeles
Honor Award

2003 Westside Urban Forum
Westside Prize

2002 Los Angeles Business Council
Los Angeles Architectural Award of Excellence

 
 
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Shinsa Shell


Shinsa Shell

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Shinsa Shell


Shinsa Shell

 

SHINSA SHELL
Seoul, South Korea | 2002

The upscale but chaotic Shinsadong district in Seoul is home to many of the city’s trendiest boutiques and cafes, housed in hastily designed buildings pasted over with mismatched materials and signs. As a counterpoint, Shinsa Shell was designed to create a place of refuge for both the eye and the body.

Six stories tall, and 20,000 SF in size, the building’s relatively monolithic form stands up to the many fragmented structures nearby, as well as the existing power pole and wires that were impossible to relocate. Clad in limestone and utilizing punched openings rather than large expanses of glass, its solid walls and reduced palette resist the colorful cacophony of their surroundings. 

Subtle angles on the structure’s long side intensify the narrowness and intimacy of the adjacent side street. Following local daylighting codes, the building’s top two floors step back to assure adequate sunlight for the street below, as well as create rooftop terraces with views of the surrounding city.

 
 
 

Project Team

Design Architect: John Friedman Alice Kimm Architects
Executive Architect: SAC International, Ltd.
Project Designer: John Friedman
Project Team: Alice Kimm, Dan Parks, Laurian Pokroy, Angela Uriu
Project Assistant: Dan Ikeda
General Contractor: Inmo Yang
Photography: Ho Kwan Park

 

CLIENT

Soon Eui Lee

 

 
 
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Lucky Devils


Lucky Devils

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Lucky Devils


Lucky Devils

 

LUCKY DEVILS
Los Angeles (Hollywood), CA | 2005

Located in an existing storefront building on Hollywood Boulevard, this 2,000 square-foot prototype for a new, organic, “fast-casual” restaurant, contributes to the resurgence of this iconic district. The target patrons of this restaurant are local business people, tourists, and late night club hoppers who desire high-quality hamburgers and hot dogs in a stimulating, authentic environment. 

The project utilizes a simple layout that includes a main eating area on one side of a central banquette and a high eating and drinking counter on the other. To create an environment that is both warm and dynamic, the project utilizes a range of materials and colors that come from high and low culture, the past and the present. These include terrazzo, concrete, walnut, vinyl, wallpaper, stainless steel, aluminum, acrylic, and various types of glass.

The signature element in the project is its ceiling, which is articulated with a number of light slots and three ‘boxes’ which fold down into the main dining space. Out of these boxes come ‘flames’ of light that animate the ceiling and contribute to the identity and branding of this new venture.

 
 
 

Project Team

Principal-in-Charge: John Friedman
Project Architect: Claudia Kessner
Project Team: Alice Kimm
Structural Engineer: William Koh and Associates, Inc.
Graphic Wallpaper Imagery: "Freeway Lights" by photographer Gregory Mancuso
Lighting Design: FIRE Ltd.
Kitchen Consultant: Michael Blackman and Associates
General Contractor: Vracko Construction
Photography: Fotoworks

Awards

2006 AIA / Los Angeles
Restaurant Design Certificate of Recognition

 

CLIENT

Lucky Vanous

 
 
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Falcon


Falcon

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Falcon


Falcon

 

FALCON
Los Angeles, CA | 2002

Located on Hollywood’s famed Sunset Boulevard, the project transformed a dilapidated craftsman house into a high-end eatery and watering hole. Channeling the glory days of Hollywood, from when Rudolph Valentino lived in the home he called “Falcon’s Lair” (for which the restaurant is named), to the Rat Pack, the Brat Pack, and today’s “celebutantes,” the design calls to the voyeuristic behavior of popular “Industry” hangouts. 

The restaurant is composed of a series of related but distinct spaces, much as in a film. A long ramp psychologically transports the patrons from the grittiness of Sunset Boulevard to the restaurant’s main entrance. The dining and bar area functions as a lounge, taking the theater as its primary design metaphor. From raised seating areas, diners can view – and be viewed by – the action in the lounge. Dark and earthy materials combine with low ceilings, and even lower light levels, to create an intimate mood.

For many, the outdoor patio is the final destination in this carefully choreographed sequence. A calm space with tall white walls, a large fireplace, and a series of wood bleachers, the purity and lightness of this space are in direct contrast to the darkness of the interior.

 
 
 

Project Team

Principal-in-Charge: Alice Kimm
Project Architect: Elif Tinaztepe
Project Team: John Friedman
Structural Engineer: Andrew Chan
Lighting Design: FIRE Ltd.
Entrance Gates Design and Fabrication: Ian Christopher Roberts
General Contractor: Bonomo Development
Photography: Fotoworks

Awards

2004 AIA / Los Angeles
Restaurant Design Certificate of Recognition 

 

CLIENT

Mike Garrett and Tommy Stoilkovich

 
 
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The Brig


The Brig

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The Brig


The Brig

 

THE BRIG
Los Angeles, CA | 2002

Located in the Venice neighborhood of Los Angeles, this 2001 renovation of a well-known but down-on-its-heels bar helped catalyze the transformation of Abbot Kinney Blvd. into one of the most vibrant commercial streets in the city. 

The richness of materials, colors, and textures in the new design creates a sensuous public space that welcomes the diverse spirit of Venice. Its mixture of elements from high and low culture maintains the original, ad-hoc quality of the bar’s interior while appealing to a new generation of patrons. A fourteen-foot long steel table with an integrated ashtray moves in and out of one of the bar’s two front doors and creates a lively space for smokers to gather on the public sidewalk. In the early evening, it serves as a communal dining table. 

Suggesting that the ubiquitous parking lots in LA can also do double duty, the parking area for the Brig was conceived as a public plaza where both cars and people can intermingle. The building’s iconic mural, which has served as the unofficial gateway into the neighborhood since its creation by Art Mortimer in 1972, has been restored and lit with fluorescent lights.

 
 
 

Project Team

Principal-in-Charge: John Friedman
Project Architect: John Martin
Project Team: Alice Kimm, Joel Cichowski
Project Assistant: Mark Meyer
Structural Engineer: William Koh and Associates, Inc.
Landscape Designer: Jay Griffith
Lighting Design: FIRE Ltd.
Barstools Design and Fabrication: Ilan Dei
General Contractor: Brunswick Builders
Photography: Fotoworks

Awards

2002 I.D. Annual Design Review
Environments Category, Best of Environments Award

 

CLIENT

David Reiss (interior) and David Paris (exterior)

 
 
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Club Sugar


Club Sugar

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Club Sugar


Club Sugar

 

CLUB SUGAR
Santa Monica, CA | 1999

This 3,000 square foot nightclub was designed to intensify the looking at and meeting of people – to both reinforce and poke fun at the inherent narcissistic and voyeuristic behavior. To this end, it brings people together in surprising ways, such as the space in the polycarbonate “tunnel” that allows people to see inside the restrooms through clear acrylic doors.

The design experiments with a palette of clear, translucent, and mirrored materials that affect the perception of the body and allow it to be presented in as many ways as possible. These include epoxy floors, stainless steel mesh curtains, zinc siding, and a number of new acrylic and polycarbonate materials. 

The new programmatic elements that make up the club were designed as semi-discrete set pieces that would slip into the existing wood and brick shell: the DJ booth, the bar, the raised seating area, the restrooms, and the polycarbonate “tunnel” that screens the restrooms from the dance floor. In this project, light is used as a material in itself. In the restrooms, it creates a sensuous, ethereal atmosphere.

 
 
 

Project Team

Principal-in-Charge: John Friedman
Project Team: Alice Kimm, Nina Lesser
Project Assistants: Joe Fleischer, Tom Steidl, Marlin Watson
Structural Engineer: William Koh and Associates, Inc.
Lighting Design: FIRE Ltd.
General Contractor: Ricki Kline
Photography: Fotoworks

Awards

1999 Interiors Entertainment Venue Category
Honorable Mention

1999 AIA Los Angeles Chapter
Merit Award

1999 Architectural Record
Record Interiors Award

 

CLIENT

David Reiss

 
 
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Beverly Center Competition


Beverly Center Competition

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Beverly Center Competition


Beverly Center Competition

BEVERLY CENTER COMPETITION

 
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T2 LAX Competition


T2 at LAX Concept

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T2 LAX Competition


T2 at LAX Concept

T2 AT LAX CONCEPT