Index
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Date
Project
2025
DCTWRP Main Warehouse Facility
  • 8
  • 2024
    Chapman University Rinker Health Sciences Campus Pedestrian Bridge
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2024
    Lucia Park
  • 7
  • 2023
    City of Anaheim PUD Sustainability Education Center and Crew Quarters Building
  • 4
  • 6
  • 8
  • 2023
    Crossroads School, Performing Arts Classroom and Theater Building
  • 4
  • 2023
    Spaulding Housing
  • 7
  • 2022
    Anna W Ngai Alumni Center
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2022
    Hudson Housing
  • 7
  • 2022
    Pio Pico Pocket Park and Parking Structure
  • 5
  • 6
  • 2022
    UCSB Associated Students Bike Shop
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 8
  • 2022
    Wells Cheang Residence
  • 7
  • 2021
    Chapman University Rinker Campus Master Plan
  • 4
  • 2021
    Redcliff Residence
  • 7
  • 2020
    Cisco Home Commerce
  • 8
  • 2020
    Cisco Home High Point
  • 8
  • 2020
    Japanese American National Museum Rooftop Event Space
  • 6
  • 2020
    UCSD Main Gym and Natatorium
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 2019
    LACDA Demonstration Homes
  • 7
  • 2018
    Caltech Watson Lab Feasibility Study
  • 4
  • 2018
    City of Fremont Warm Springs Innovation District Concept Study
  • 6
  • 8
  • 2018
    Netflix Animation Hub
  • 8
  • 2018
    UC Berkeley Olympic Rowing Facility Feasibility Study
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 2017
    CSULA Makerspace Feasibility Study
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2017
    Grand Avenue Housing
  • 7
  • 2016
    Glendale Artist's Residence
  • 7
  • 2016
    Lalique
  • 7
  • 2015
    Crossroads Shopping Center
  • 8
  • 2014
    AEG Parking Structure
  • 8
  • 2014
    Claremont McKenna College Aquatics Center Feasibility Study
  • 4
  • 5
  • 2014
    Rouleau Residence
  • 7
  • 2013
    Bordeaux Sister Cities Pavilion
  • 6
  • 2013
    Cobb Residence
  • 7
  • 2012
    Tom Bradley Mini Mobile Museum
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2012
    UCLA Ackerman Student Union
  • 4
  • 6
  • 8
  • 2011
    Brown Jordan Showroom at Pacific Design Center
  • 8
  • 2011
    Y-F House
  • 7
  • 2010
    LACCD Harbor College Job Placement and Data Center
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2010
    Stanfordville Residence
  • 7
  • 2008
    Mira International Trade Center
  • 8
  • 2008
    Monterey Park Hotel
  • 393
  • 2008
    Vista Hermosa Park Buildings
  • 6
  • 2008
    Zoo Magnet Schools
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2007
    Berglass-Bluthenthal Residence Renovation
  • 7
  • 2005
    New Antioch Church of God in Christ Sunday School Addition
  • 394
  • 2000
    K-Residence 87-Lex
  • 7
  • 1999
    Bundang Townhouses
  • 7
  • 1998
    Ayres Residence Renovation
  • 7
  • 1998
    Pinedo Residence, Fallbrook
  • 7
  • 1997
    Noodle Stories
  • 8
  • 2002
    Shinsadong Building
  • 8
  • 1996
    Parashu
  • 8
  • 1993
    Sun Gallery
  • 7
  • NAVIG8 – Council District 8 Homeless Navigation Center

    Located in an underserved neighborhood in South LA, this 5,700 SF public facility provides much-needed services for the unhoused, including: Personal Storage in secure, mobile bins; Personal Hygiene (showers and toilets); and informal Counseling. In order to speed construction, reduce waste, mitigate pollution, and create an affordable, replicable prototype, the building was constructed of prefabricated modules assembled on-site.

    Notably, the structure dignifies homelessness with an iconic, civic-scaled design that has a strong street presence. Rather than hide away, it stands out and welcomes our family, friends, and neighbors in need of assistance. It acknowledges the power of architecture to destigmatize and to celebrate our common humanity; it is an uplifting addition to LA’s constructed public landscape. The iconic gable “house” form alludes to the homelike services provided here, while the same form used upside-down suggests that home can be anyplace; home is where one makes it.

    Yangsan Golf Club

    Set amidst the mountains near Pusan, South Korea, this 50,000 square-foot structure rejects the typical approach to the design of a golf clubhouse – one where traditional forms and imported materials are used to express power, money, and privilege. Instead, it utilizes a contemporary language that is informed by regional sensibilities and local materials.

    Inspired by ancient fortresses located nearby, the building is composed of a number of limestone volumes that firmly anchor the building to the earth. These volumes are juxtaposed with several upwardly-tilting roofs clad in lead-coated copper. Large expanses of glass allow each of the public interior spaces to have sweeping views over the golf course to the mountains beyond. The generous use of skylights creates dramatic lighting effects.

    Each of the three nine-hole segments on the golf course contains a “tee house,” a small pavilion offering restrooms and a café. Their overhanging roofs create shaded outdoor rooms and frame views of the surrounding topography. The abstract form and flat roofs of these structures suggest small tables floating among the hills, lakes, and sand pits of the golf course.

    SK Swim Center

    Located in a new park between Ulsan’s ragged urban edge and a national forest, this 50,000 SF structure clearly defines the city’s boundary, providing a much-needed recreational facility for this ad hoc, industrial city. The swimming hall is set under its own high floating roof while its locker rooms, the park’s administrative offices, and a visitors’ center are condensed under a curving roof plane that slopes down to the park’s entrance. A result of simultaneously addressing the park’s entrance, avoiding an existing underground culvert, and maximizing the promenade facing the lake, the building’s curved form also serves to naturalize the building’s large size.

    An open space between the visitors’ center and the entry to the pools creates an outdoor foyer that provides protection from the elements and welcomes people entering the park on foot. The swimming hall provides views of the mountains and lake outside, and the collection of pools is further activated by natural light from numerous skylights. Responding to the toughness of the urban condition, the long, primarily opaque elevation facing the city is clad with corrugated aluminum panels and lead-coated copper.

    UCLA Kinross Recreation Center

    With the displacement of an existing fitness center geared specifically towards servicing the university’s graduate student population, UCLA opted to take over a prominent off-campus corner at the intersection of Veteran and Kinross Avenues (currently used for parking) and locate a new fitness center there. A series of modular portable buildings was envisioned to be fitted out for this purpose.

    The resultant 9,990 SF facility upgraded the graduate students’ existing workout facility and provide a dynamic, light-filled and open environment in which to work out and socialize. The interior opens out to an exterior training area with an overhead canopy structure that provides needed shade. Service zones have been located to create acoustic buffers against the traffic and automobiles in the vicinity.

    UCLA Bruin Fitness Center

    The Bruin Fitness Center is a 15,000 square-foot facility. It features open-plan cardio, strength, and stretching zones tied together by a central circulation spine for an easy-to-navigate layout.

    The fitness center occupies what was once parking and storage for campus housing maintenance staff. Extensive mechanical equipment in the existing space had to be considered, worked around, protected, and at times relocated in order to make this programmatic shift possible. The material palette blends some of the raw materiality of the parking garage’s existing ducts, plumbing, and concrete with the elegant and sustainable material choices of the Carnesale dining hall above.

    Since the fitness center is partially submerged with limited access to daylight, the fitness center is oriented towards the major opening of the space: a large, operable glass garage door. The creative use of high quality artificial lighting, graphic wallpapers, and color throughout help to ensure that the facility never feels like a basement.

    Roberts Pavilion, Claremont McKenna College

    The sculptural form of Roberts Pavilion, which bulges and retreats according to the particularities of its tight site, creates an iconic image that helps brand the college, and simultaneously anchors a new and important campus entry.  Each of its facades has been designed to simultaneously take advantage of existing views and limit heat gain, its terra cotta cladding providing gravitas to the structure while serving as a heat sink, absorbing heat during the day and emitting it at night.

    Inside, a three-level main arena sits at the heart of the facility, around which the other programmatic elements are organized and accessed by a series of wide “streets” designed to promote interaction and community. (In fact, as the College has no formal “student center,” this building has stepped into that function.)  Spacious yet compact, strategic transparencies throughout the structure create strong visual connections and a welcoming environment overall, where anyone feels invited to try a new activity.  Providing a venue for music, drama, and school congregations in addition to sports, the design of the Lobby eschews the typical sports-related imagery and instead presents a “Character Wall” that incorporates three-dimensional letters that spell out the names of ten important character traits in ten different languages and cultures, thereby representing the diversity of the college’s students, its global outlook, and the academic puzzles that are at the heart of its mission.