Index
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Date
Project
2025
DCTWRP Main Warehouse Facility
  • 8
  • 2024
    Chapman University Rinker Health Sciences Campus Pedestrian Bridge
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2024
    Lucia Park
  • 7
  • 2023
    City of Anaheim PUD Sustainability Education Center and Crew Quarters Building
  • 4
  • 6
  • 8
  • 2023
    Crossroads School, Performing Arts Classroom and Theater Building
  • 4
  • 2023
    Spaulding Housing
  • 7
  • 2022
    Anna W Ngai Alumni Center
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2022
    Hudson Housing
  • 7
  • 2022
    Pio Pico Pocket Park and Parking Structure
  • 5
  • 6
  • 2022
    UCSB Associated Students Bike Shop
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 8
  • 2022
    Wells Cheang Residence
  • 7
  • 2021
    Chapman University Rinker Campus Master Plan
  • 4
  • 2021
    Redcliff Residence
  • 7
  • 2020
    Cisco Home Commerce
  • 8
  • 2020
    Cisco Home High Point
  • 8
  • 2020
    Japanese American National Museum Rooftop Event Space
  • 6
  • 2020
    UCSD Main Gym and Natatorium
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 2019
    LACDA Demonstration Homes
  • 7
  • 2018
    Caltech Watson Lab Feasibility Study
  • 4
  • 2018
    City of Fremont Warm Springs Innovation District Concept Study
  • 6
  • 8
  • 2018
    Netflix Animation Hub
  • 8
  • 2018
    UC Berkeley Olympic Rowing Facility Feasibility Study
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 2017
    CSULA Makerspace Feasibility Study
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2017
    Grand Avenue Housing
  • 7
  • 2016
    Glendale Artist's Residence
  • 7
  • 2016
    Lalique
  • 7
  • 2015
    Crossroads Shopping Center
  • 8
  • 2014
    AEG Parking Structure
  • 8
  • 2014
    Claremont McKenna College Aquatics Center Feasibility Study
  • 4
  • 5
  • 2014
    Rouleau Residence
  • 7
  • 2013
    Bordeaux Sister Cities Pavilion
  • 6
  • 2013
    Cobb Residence
  • 7
  • 2012
    Tom Bradley Mini Mobile Museum
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2012
    UCLA Ackerman Student Union
  • 4
  • 6
  • 8
  • 2011
    Brown Jordan Showroom at Pacific Design Center
  • 8
  • 2011
    Y-F House
  • 7
  • 2010
    LACCD Harbor College Job Placement and Data Center
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2010
    Stanfordville Residence
  • 7
  • 2008
    Mira International Trade Center
  • 8
  • 2008
    Monterey Park Hotel
  • 393
  • 2008
    Vista Hermosa Park Buildings
  • 6
  • 2008
    Zoo Magnet Schools
  • 4
  • 6
  • 2007
    Berglass-Bluthenthal Residence Renovation
  • 7
  • 2005
    New Antioch Church of God in Christ Sunday School Addition
  • 394
  • 2000
    K-Residence 87-Lex
  • 7
  • 1999
    Bundang Townhouses
  • 7
  • 1998
    Ayres Residence Renovation
  • 7
  • 1998
    Pinedo Residence, Fallbrook
  • 7
  • 1997
    Noodle Stories
  • 8
  • 2002
    Shinsadong Building
  • 8
  • 1996
    Parashu
  • 8
  • 1993
    Sun Gallery
  • 7
  • Cumulus at The Sunset

    Cumulus suggests dynamic new possibilities for urban signage within the framework of The Sunset, a re-visioned, pedestrian-oriented retail and wellness development at Sunset Plaza. Cumulus takes the place of three existing static signage elements on The Sunset property that will be demolished, and is a sculptural steel structure holding two new static signs positioned for maximum visibility from cars traveling both east and west along Sunset Blvd. Cumulus establishes a striking silhouette in the skyline of West Hollywood and acts as a gateway connecting the contrasting physical landscapes of the City; ground with sky; and the immediacy of the pedestrian experience with the more distant, 35-mile-per-hour view. It is a technological garden in the sky.

    Cumulus is placed atop The Sunset’s easternmost building. Approximately one-third of its overall surface area is planted; the remaining convex surfaces are painted to replicate nature. The two static signs are pressed into the richly three-dimensional volumes of the frame, and the concave indents that surround the signs are rendered white to offer up the highest possible contrast between billboards and frame, image and context.

    Through both its form and its greenness, the frame advances the City of West Hollywood’s and The Sunset’s common mission to advance pedestrianism, connectivity, and human-centeredness – ingredients that make up a uniquely urban sustainability. As a “cloud”, it also refers to our ubiquitous information cloud. But while information technology has its pitfalls, Cumulus uses it to humanize our world by providing a whimsical spectacle to be marveled at, one that provokes wonder and perhaps even joy. Cumulus also enhances the often alienating automobile experience to be richer and more surprising.

    Cumulus, in reframing the billboard atop The Sunset, defines a familiar terrain anew.

    Revisioning Beverly Center

    Club Sugar

    This 3,000 square foot nightclub was designed to intensify the looking at and meeting of people – to both reinforce and poke fun at the inherent narcissistic and voyeuristic behavior. To this end, it brings people together in surprising ways, such as the space in the polycarbonate “tunnel” that allows people to see inside the restrooms through clear acrylic doors.

    The design experiments with a palette of clear, translucent, and mirrored materials that affect the perception of the body and allow it to be presented in as many ways as possible. These include epoxy floors, stainless steel mesh curtains, zinc siding, and a number of new acrylic and polycarbonate materials.

    The new programmatic elements that make up the club were designed as semi-discrete set pieces that would slip into the existing wood and brick shell: the DJ booth, the bar, the raised seating area, the restrooms, and the polycarbonate “tunnel” that screens the restrooms from the dance floor. In this project, light is used as a material in itself. In the restrooms, it creates a sensuous, ethereal atmosphere.

    The Brig

    Located in the Venice neighborhood of Los Angeles, this 2001 renovation of a well-known but down-on-its-heels bar helped catalyze the transformation of Abbot Kinney Blvd. into one of the most vibrant commercial streets in the city.

    The richness of materials, colors, and textures in the new design creates a sensuous public space that welcomes the diverse spirit of Venice. Its mixture of elements from high and low culture maintains the original, ad-hoc quality of the bar’s interior while appealing to a new generation of patrons. A fourteen-foot long steel table with an integrated ashtray moves in and out of one of the bar’s two front doors and creates a lively space for smokers to gather on the public sidewalk. In the early evening, it serves as a communal dining table.

    Suggesting that the ubiquitous parking lots in LA can also do double duty, the parking area for the Brig was conceived as a public plaza where both cars and people can intermingle. The building’s iconic mural, which has served as the unofficial gateway into the neighborhood since its creation by Art Mortimer in 1972, has been restored and lit with fluorescent lights.

    Falcon

    Located on Hollywood’s famed Sunset Boulevard, the project transformed a dilapidated craftsman house into a high-end eatery and watering hole. Channeling the glory days of Hollywood, from when Rudolph Valentino lived in the home he called “Falcon’s Lair” (for which the restaurant is named), to the Rat Pack, the Brat Pack, and today’s “celebutantes,” the design calls to the voyeuristic behavior of popular “Industry” hangouts.

    The restaurant is composed of a series of related but distinct spaces, much as in a film. A long ramp psychologically transports the patrons from the grittiness of Sunset Boulevard to the restaurant’s main entrance. The dining and bar area functions as a lounge, taking the theater as its primary design metaphor. From raised seating areas, diners can view – and be viewed by – the action in the lounge. Dark and earthy materials combine with low ceilings, and even lower light levels, to create an intimate mood.

    For many, the outdoor patio is the final destination in this carefully choreographed sequence. A calm space with tall white walls, a large fireplace, and a series of wood bleachers, the purity and lightness of this space are in direct contrast to the darkness of the interior.

    Lucky Devils

    Located in an existing storefront building on Hollywood Boulevard, this 2,000 square-foot prototype for a new, organic, “fast-casual” restaurant, contributes to the resurgence of this iconic district. The target patrons of this restaurant are local business people, tourists, and late night club hoppers who desire high-quality hamburgers and hot dogs in a stimulating, authentic environment.

    The project utilizes a simple layout that includes a main eating area on one side of a central banquette and a high eating and drinking counter on the other. To create an environment that is both warm and dynamic, the project utilizes a range of materials and colors that come from high and low culture, the past and the present. These include terrazzo, concrete, walnut, vinyl, wallpaper, stainless steel, aluminum, acrylic, and various types of glass.

    The signature element in the project is its ceiling, which is articulated with a number of light slots and three ‘boxes’ which fold down into the main dining space. Out of these boxes come ‘flames’ of light that animate the ceiling and contribute to the identity and branding of this new venture.

    Shinsa Shell

    The upscale but chaotic Shinsadong district in Seoul is home to many of the city’s trendiest boutiques and cafes, housed in hastily designed buildings pasted over with mismatched materials and signs. As a counterpoint, Shinsa Shell was designed to create a place of refuge for both the eye and the body.

    Six stories tall, and 20,000 SF in size, the building’s relatively monolithic form stands up to the many fragmented structures nearby, as well as the existing power pole and wires that were impossible to relocate. Clad in limestone and utilizing punched openings rather than large expanses of glass, its solid walls and reduced palette resist the colorful cacophony of their surroundings.

    Subtle angles on the structure’s long side intensify the narrowness and intimacy of the adjacent side street. Following local daylighting codes, the building’s top two floors step back to assure adequate sunlight for the street below, as well as create rooftop terraces with views of the surrounding city.

    LA Design Center

    Located in the heart of South Los Angeles, an economically disadvantaged neighborhood at the center of the city’s 2001 civil disturbances, this project was conceived by furnituremaker Cisco Pinedo as a commercial center to highlight the area’s multi-talented young furniture design and fabrication companies and bring much-needed support and attention to this part of town.

    How does/should one design for South Central Los Angeles? That was the question we asked ourselves, not even a decade after riots had broken out following the acquittal of the LAPD officers who had beaten Rodney King senseless for nothing more than speeding in his Hyundai.

    As a start, we hypothesized that by reusing the existing buildings, by treating them with respect and affection, we would, in a sense, be communicating respect for the neighborhood as a whole.  We then took that idea further, layering the structures with a set of light, heterogeneous materials and screens that would seem both permanent and impermanent at the same time – a set of new clothes that would provide a strong identity for the spaces and buildings, but also seem flexible, open-ended, and inclusive.  We placed long, lightweight sheets of iridescent polycarbonate on existing heavy steel columns, over walls of warm brick; a “woven” stainless steel door in an existing window opening we extended to reach the floor; a porous fabric canopy over the existing parking lot; and a gate and fence at the entrance that didn’t pretend to be for any purpose other than security but was unique, nonetheless. Inside the buildings, we created an environment to showcase our client’s furniture, which was fabricated onsite using the same materials and strategies that we used outside. Our client opened his property to community usage. People came. No one defaced or graffiti-ed a single square inch, in a neighborhood that is regularly vandalized.

    La Kretz Innovation Campus

    Home to the academic powerhouses of Caltech, UCLA and more recently USC, Los Angeles is a powerful center of innovation, and therefore actively engaged in finding technological solutions to the perils of climate change.

    Housed in 61,000 square feet of renovated mid-century warehouses, La Kretz Innovation Campus is LA’s latest addition to address that challenge, the home of both a Department of Water and Power Energy Innovation Center, and more importantly LA Cleantech Incubator – a locus of engineers, scientists, and policymakers whose mission is to shepherd start-ups with promising new clean technologies into becoming successful and globally-minded companies.

    Preserving the character of the warehouse district in which the facility is located (as well as the existing structures’ carbon footprint), the buildings’ exteriors have primarily been maintained in their original condition, which is also the case in the interior, though its strengthened brick walls and wood trusses are in open dialogue with a collection of dynamic architectural elements such as a waiting area known as the “green room,” jewellike skylight “funnels” that light up the reception area, a series of enclosed offices and conference rooms backed up to the brick walls, open work areas, and other necessary programmatic elements, all joined in a “village” concept with “streets,” a “loop,” and a “plaza” large enough for gatherings of up to 140 people.

    Walking the walk, the facility achieved LEED-Platinum as well as WELL-Gold (the first facility in the United States to garner both certifications simultaneously) by integrating advanced sustainability technologies that include a greywater filtration system, bioswales, a microgrid, and a solar photovoltaic canopy over the parking lot.